A 10-min tour of a Maine river(12.27.18) & woodland(01-09-19)

File this under Maine winter, South View Trail Network & a tip of my hat to bushcraft (via snowshoes). It's a mini-travel log.

Ed Hummel
10 months agoJanuary 10, 2019
The artist in you is really coming out in this one!!  This is also a good example of how the climate of central Maine has become more like that of what southern New England used to see about 40 years ago.  I grew up in New Bedford which in on the southern Massachusetts coast and this type of snowfall was very typical there since most snowstorms occurred with the temperature right near freezing.  Therefore, it was usually a very wet snow that stuck to everything.  In the old days up here on the other hand most snow was with temperatures in the teens and lower so that it was usually very powdery and didn't stick to anything since it was so dry.  It was lousy for snowballs because it wouldn't stick together.  So, the kids around here didn't know the joys of throwing snowballs at passing cars and trucks the way we did in New Bedford and other places down "south".  Too bad most kids these days don't play outside any more so motorists around here probably don't have to worry about being attacked by juvenile snowball snipers.
Alder Stone Fuller
10 months agoJanuary 10, 2019
Many thanks, Ed.  I always appreciate your comments.  I. just uploaded the new version.  It's now 10:11, down a full minute.  First part is captioned now.  I also added a different, more sensible link at the end, continuing in the arts direction.  
More to say, but that's good for now.
Patrick Myers
10 months agoJanuary 11, 2019
08:20:59
Wonderful piece and thanks for the email - especially since I have a cameo in the video! Plowtruck #2 at 8:21 :-) I waved as I drove by, but you can't see it through my back window. This was a wonderful storm, glad you got out in it.
Alder Stone Fuller
10 months agoJanuary 11, 2019
{laughing with joy} 

It was indeed a wonderful storm.  

Life is good, yes?
Ed Hummel
10 months agoJanuary 11, 2019
The extra labels add more to it, especially when the wind is blowing in your mic!  That last label showing plows 6, non-plows 3 says it all!!
Alder Stone Fuller
10 months agoJanuary 11, 2019
Thanks for your feedback, Ed.  Glad it worked.  Watch it again.  As of today (01.11.19), I've completed it (99.9%), and the latter part now has both music and narration (done in the studio).  This was one of the most challenging sound adjustments I've ever tried -- to have voice over narration over the music in a way that both are at a comfortable level.  HOURS of work.  Let me know if it works.  

And, Patrick, I've added a tag to your truck.  :-)
Bonnie Sammons
10 months agoJanuary 12, 2019
It was a beautiful storm - one of those that draws us out to try and capture it on film, as you did.  Well done!
James Burke
10 months agoJanuary 13, 2019
Beautifully done. Enjoyed- especially sitting in front of my fireplace in Oregon watching the National News about all those storms everywhere else.
The Mill is almost identical to Oregon City falls and mill- less the ice.
Stay warm and don't eat the yellow snow.
Alder Stone Fuller
10 months agoJanuary 13, 2019
01:41:09
Bon, thanks much.  And it's great to read that you labeled the storm as "beautiful".  Indeed, part of nature's dynamic beauty.  I find some element of beauty in even the most ferocious and destructive ones like hurricanes.  Such storms are a reminder of nature's power and who -- or what -- is really in charge on this planet.  

James, I got a good laugh about "yellow snow" (a reference to Frank Zappa's song about dental floss in Montana).  Around here, the bigger issue is gray/black snow on the roads and highways, a function of plowing, sanding and salting.  You can see an example of it on the Essex St bridge at about 1:40 (click the link to the left), piled up on the opposite sidewalk.  (Getting up on that to film that downriver segment was no easy task -- they don't plow snow off of that sidewalk on that side.)   By winter's end, it can get pretty ugly, and it's always nice to get a fresh dusting to clean things up.
Patrick Myers
10 months agoJanuary 15, 2019
Hi Alder, 
I like the new narration. I think the balance between soundtrack and voice-over was good.  The only moment that my ear pulled me out of the experience was at 6:51 ..there was a small cut and change in location but the sound track also restarted which 'caught' my ear. I appreciate the change in soundtrack when you shift location and subject matter, but this transition seemed fairly minor and I wonder if keeping the soundtrack rolling in the background would be appropriate? I know I'm really nit-picking, but that's because all the work you've done on it is so so good I have to find the little nits to pick :-)
Alder Stone Fuller
10 months agoJanuary 15, 2019
Patrick, thanks!  Professionals like you are allowed to pick nits.  :-)  Let me take a look a that point and see if I can do anything, or if it was intentional.  I'll get back to you.
Alder Stone Fuller
10 months agoJanuary 15, 2019
Ah, yes, that pause in the music is intentional for two reasons.  1) I needed a significant change in the music right at that point as I transitioned to comments about Tan Stone.  But the sound track was repetitive right there.  So, I faded the sound track, cut it, and re-started the track as the image shifted.  It's a poor attempt at a crescendo saying, "Look; something new here."   

2) As a secondary result that I hadn't planned on, it also allows the viewer to focus on the peace of the scene that I'd just noted -- by having the music fade right there before the jump, it adds (hopefully) a momentary feeling of peace.  At least that's my intention.  Hopefully that makes some sense.  

And thanks for raising the issue; it's always good to be able to explain my (sometimes twisted) video production techniques, that just continue to evolve.  I'm now trying to make them as artistic as informative; I see this as my new art form.
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